Over-zealous Security Issues

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Douglas Willett 1 year, 11 months ago.

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  • #2209

    Douglas Willett
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15
    • Post: 18

    First, I had no video (skype, camorama, etc).  It turned out to be that root owned /dev/video with no permissions for regular users.   My quick solution was                                                       “sudo chmod 777 /dev/video*”.

    Next, I noticed every time that I do anything (mount, open file, etc) involving an external drive, I have to put in my password.  No amount of changes of ownership, permissions, etc seems to remove this annoyance.  “Execute” is automatically changed to “nobody” by the computer as soon as I close the file.  Is there a way to remove this behavior?  This is only happening with files on externally mounted drives and the drives themselves.

    #2221
    eter
    eter
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 32
    • Replies: 45
    • Post: 77

    Hi
    1.Skype
    grep video /etc/group
    sudo usermod -a -G “group” “user”
    group – video
    user – username
    2.mount
    Can you describe the problem a bit more.
    Enter the result from the terminal [group]

    You want to help in the development?
    Comments and suggestions welcome!

    #2225

    Douglas Willett
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15
    • Post: 18

    /etc/group   (user = me):

    What other groups should “me” join?

    I use pcmanfm with property set to “open external drive when inserted”.  However, it asks for password first.

    External drives are opened in the directory /media/me.  I own this directory and have permissions set to anyone.  Yet, if I left-click a .tex file it asks for password before opening.  If I right click it and choose to open with geany, it does not require a password.

    None of this is critical, but it is an unnecessary nuisance.  Any tricks to eliminate using a password in general would be appreciated.  Thank you.

    #2226
    eter
    eter
    Keymaster
    • Topics: 32
    • Replies: 45
    • Post: 77

    Hi
    Is it the same with thunar?
    Do you use .xinitrc to load the session?
    Check out this problem and will call – No authorization!

    You want to help in the development?
    Comments and suggestions welcome!

    #2227

    Douglas Willett
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15
    • Post: 18

    It is the same with thunar.  I have not changed anything regarding session loading.  I assume xinit is doing it.

    Here is a picture of the result of left-clicking a .tex file in the mounted 16GB thumb drive.  Geany is set as preferred application for .tex files.  If I right-click the file and choose geany to open, it opens instantly, no password needed.  Permissions on the file are set:  owner:  me;   group:  me, but computer insists on executable: nobody,  even after I change it.

    http://lxlinux.com/psswd.png

    #2228

    Douglas Willett
    Participant
    • Topics: 3
    • Replies: 15
    • Post: 18

    Well, I did something to get .tex and .txt files in external drives to open with a left-click, edit and save without needing a password.  Other files also behave properly.  Strangely, the computer continues to set permission>execute as nobody for all files, even though anyone is now able to open them without using a password.

    I did 2+ things.  I reset, or possibly set in some cases, the default app for the file types.   And I edited /etc/sudoers with sudo visudo to add:   me ALL = NOPASSWD: ALL.

    External drives are still not automatically mounted.  Password is always asked for and must be entered before a drive is mounted.  Is there a general command that I could put in /etc/fstab that would automatically mount any external drive?  The problem using fstab is what should be specified as directory since the computer picks the mount directory differently for each mount and each time.

    Doing all this taught me a new thing.  Give root a password (sudo passwd root), if she doesn’t already have one, then re-log-in as root using that password.  Now you can run the computer without being asked for a password at every turn.  The first problem doing this is that everything (menus, openbox, panels, etc) set-up in /home/me has to be re-set-up in /root to have the same system.  For example, as user me, ~=/home/me, but as root, ~=/root, so all menu addresses have to be adjusted accordingly.    The second problem is that every time you launch thunar you have to stare at a danger warning sign.  I think Puppy Linux is set-up this way as default, just one user, root.

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